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Summary and Comments

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Category: 

Domino_Effect

Date: 

1997-11-04 10:01:58

Subject: 

A List of Major Dominoes: An Engineer's Perspective

  Link:

http://www.iee.org.uk/2000risk/guide/year2k18.htm

Comment: 

The interconnection problem is what threatens us. Even if one organization can get 2000-compliant, it is still part of a system in whch most organizations will not be compliant. The division of labor is at risk. This means that our civilization is at risk.

This list appears on the site of the British organization, the Institution of Electrical Engineers. The site deals with embedded chips. Think "power grid."

* * * * * * *

2.10.1 Supply chain relationships are subject to Year 2000 sensitivity and may affect systems, plant and equipment and their safety in a number of ways. They will be of particular concern in companies which operate on a just-in-time basis. The following examples are real problems which Year 2000 Programme Managers have been considering.:

(a) Breakdown of suppliers’ systems resulting in inability to supply raw material, other supplies, or services

(b) Breakdown of customers’ systems resulting in their inability to accept products

(c) Cessation of trading by suppliers. It has been suggested that some companies may cease to trade in order to avoid their liabilities

(d) Breakdown of customers’ and suppliers’ computer systems resulting in inability to supply or receive data in electronic form

(e) Suppliers’ non-compliant data; customers’ inability to accept your data because it is non-compliant or alternatively because it is compliant but their system is not.

2.10.2 A more fundamental approach starting with the following headings may be useful:

(a) Raw materials input -- what goes into the product

(b) Maintenance input -- what is used to keep the system (your company) going, such as fuel and office supplies

(c) Output -- your business depends on there being customers to accept your products

(d) Information input -- customer orders; marketing information; etc.; information about suppliers and their products

(e) Total or partial failure of connected systems (suppliers, customers and business partners) on which your company depends.

Link: 

http://www.iee.org.uk/2000risk/guide/year2k18.htm

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