Make your own free website on Tripod.com
Recommended Resources
Cyberhaven.com Offshore havens, asset protection, global investing and other useful techniques.
The Year 2000 Bookshelf Books to help your evaluate the Y2K problems you face.

Gary North's Y2K Links and Forums - Mirror

Summary and Comments

(feel free to mail this page)


Category: 

Introduction

Date: 

1997-11-14 10:34:49

Subject: 

Things You Had Better Do Today (and not Do in Jan. 2000)

  Link:

http://www.isquare.com/y2k.htm

Comment: 

This list was published by the Small Businerss Advisor.

* * * * * * *

THINGS TO DO DURING THE NEXT FEW MONTHS:

1. Write letters to financial institutions with whom you have dealing (banks, mortgage company, etc) and ask if they are Year 2000 compliant. Send the letter registered and ask for a signed return receipt. A sample letter is included at the end of this report. Ask for up-to-date copies of your records. There are going to be plenty of lawsuits relating to the Y2K problem. These letters may come in handy.

2. Get copies of your credit report.

3. Make certain your financial records are complete and up-to-date. If you are not already doing so, keep records of EVERY one of your financial transactions.

4. Ensure you have copies of the last five years of your state and Federal tax returns.

5. If you own stocks or other instruments, and the company holding them does not convince you that they are Y2K compliant, consider selling your holdings and do not reinvest until after Jan 1, 2000. Check with your tax advisor for the best way to do this so that you do not incur unnecessary tax liabilities.

6. Check your own personal computer for Y2K compliance. This involves checking both the hardware and software packages you use. Checking the hardware involves the use a small software package that will test to determine if your hardware will function properly after 12/31/99.

7. Contact each manufacturer of your software packages and ask if they are Y2K compliant. Again, the Internet is an efficient way to do this since nearly all software manufacturers have websites. For example, Microsoft, at: http://www.microsoft.com.

8. Carefully check every invoice and bill you receive. Errors are likely to occur.

9. If you are doing any traveling, check and recheck your reservation status with hotels, motels, airlines, trains, rental cars, etc.

THINGS YOU SHOULD CONSIDER NOT DOING BETWEEN DECEMBER 30, 1999 AND JANUARY 5, 2000:

1. Fly on an airplane (air traffic control may be disrupted or fail; on-board computer systems may fail)

2. Use an elevator (Elevators may stop suddenly between floors; doors may fail to open)

3. Schedule any medical tests or surgery in a hospital (hospital records may become corrupted; emergency systems may fail)

4. Make a long distance call at midnight, Dec 31, 1999. (you might get charged for a 99 year long phone call)

5. Ride a train or any underground people movers (subways, etc) (traffic systems may fail, automatic systems may malfunction)

6. Don't use an ATM machine (your bank account records may reflect an incorrect withdrawal amount)

7. Don't make a bank deposit (your account may not reflect the deposit)

8. Don't pay any bills (pay any bills due the first few days of January, 2000 the middle of December, 1999. Send payments via registered mail (this one time) and keep good records of the payment! (You may find that your account is not properly credited)

Link: 

http://www.isquare.com/y2k.htm

Return to Category: Introduction

Return to Main Categories

Return to Home Page